Force Online Archive when main mailbox is full


These days I am migrating from GMail to Exchange Online and I have found that if the user fills his main mailbox and you enable archiving this does not go into action at same moment, yo noeed to wait for 30-60 minutes.

For this you have to force it from powershell with the following command:

Start-ManagedFolderAssistant –Identity <mailbox>





Windows Server 2016 Published!


This week Microsoft has published the last version of Windows Server, Windows Server 2016 and with a lot of improvements.

On the below link you can read more about!

And here a link to a free book.


Update Rollup 1 for System Center Configuration Manager current branch, version 1606 available


Our folks of ConfigMgr Product Team relased an Update Rollup for the 1606 version of Current Branch.

Here is the announcement:

And here the specifications of what improve/fix:


Available Update 1606 for System Center Configuration Manager


Good news! yesterday was announced the availability of ConfigMgr Current Branch 1606. This is not a minor update and comes with a lot of improvements focused on Security, Device Management, ConfigMgr Monitoring, Service and Updates Node options, Application management, etc…

Some of new features are:

  • Windows Information Protection (formerly EDP) features allow you to create and deploy information protection policy, including the ability to choose your protected apps and define your EDP-protection level.


  • Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection features enable the ability to on-board and off-board Windows 10 clients to the cloud service and view agent health in the monitoring dashboard (requires a Windows Defender ATP tenant in Azure).


  • Windows Store for Business Integration allows you to manage and deploy applications purchased through the Windows Store for Business portal for both online and offline licensed apps.


  • Windows Hello for Business policies for domain-joined Windows 10 devices managed by the Configuration Manager client.


More info about Current Branch:


Microsoft Active Directory Topology Diagrammer

Hi guys,

I put the link to download the Microsoft Active Directory Topology Diagrammer.

With the Active Directory Topology Diagrammer tool, you can read your Active Directory structure through LDAP. The Active Directory Topology Diagrammer tool automates Microft Office Visio to draw a diagram of the Active Directory Domain topology, your Active Directory Site topology, your OU structure, your DFS-R topology or your current Exchange 20XX Server Organization. With the Active Directory Topology Diagrammer tool, you can also draw partial Information from your Active Directory, like only one Domain or one site. The objects are linked together, and arranged in a reasonable layout that you can later interactively work withthe objects in Microsoft Office Visio.

See you!!

Powershell Script to request info about state of AD Site links

Hi guys,

I read an interesting post in the Ashled McGlone blog that I think is good to remark.

See you!


Author’s note:  Before you dismiss this article you should know that the top two areas where I find issues for AD health are replication and DNS.  If you’re short on time skip to the bottom section “But Wait… There’s More” and run that report in your environment.  Otherwise I think you’ll get a lot of value from this content.

Freaky Neat

MonkIn my role as a Microsoft Premier Field Engineer I get to see what our customers do with Active Directory, both good and bad. Some admins are neat freaks about keeping everything pretty. (Imagine Adrian Monk as an AD admin.)  Others barely have time to open Facebook at work, and neatness is not a priority. Those are just the facts of IT life.  Consequently one area we frequently clean up is AD replication. You can see my former articles here on cleaning up replication settings.

What is hiding in your site links?

Today’s post will help you clean up site link descriptions and give you some nice reporting capability. For a quick overview of the terminology you can read the landmark TechNet article How Replication Works. To make a long story short admins create sites and then link them together with site links. Like most things in life change happens, and we don’t go back to clean up afterwards. I commonly find orphaned site links, mondo links with too many sites, and site link descriptions that haven’t been updated to reflect their member sites. (Use the free AD Topology Diagrammer to get a really cool Visio diagram of your sites and links.)

Some folks like to set their site link description field to list each of the member sites in the link. If that is you, then you’ll love this script.  Today’s script enumerates all of the member sites in a site link and then concatenates their names into the description of the site link.  Also, it will make a note in the description for any site links that have change notification enabled.  Now that’s handy!

Here is a screenshot from my lab showing what the descriptions can look like:


The Code

First let’s list the sitelinks:

# List all sitelinks            
Get-ADObject -LDAPFilter '(objectClass=siteLink)' ` 
    -SearchBase (Get-ADRootDSE).ConfigurationNamingContext ` 
    -Property Name, Cost, Description, Sitelist |            
    Format-List Name, Cost, Description, Sitelist

Now let’s update the descriptions:

# One ridiculous line of code            
# Broken down for readability            
Get-ADObject -LDAPFilter '(&(objectClass=siteLink)(siteList=*))' ` 
    -SearchBase (Get-ADRootDSE).ConfigurationNamingContext ` 
    -Property Name, Cost, Sitelist, Options |            
    ForEach {            
        Set-ADObject -Identity $_.DistinguishedName -Replace @{            
                ForEach ($site in $_.sitelist) {            
                    $s += "$($site.SubString(3,$site.IndexOf(",")-3)) <--> "            
                If ($_.Options -band 1) {' (Notify)'}            

Some site links have been orphaned and emptied by deleting the member sites and forgetting to delete the associated site link. For those here is a modified line that will update their description to ‘EMPTY SITE LINK’.

# Flag empty site links            
Get-ADObject -LDAPFilter '(&(objectClass=siteLink)(!siteList=*))' ` 
    -SearchBase (Get-ADRootDSE).ConfigurationNamingContext ` 
    -Property Name, Sitelist, Options |            
    % {Set-ADObject -Identity $_.DistinguishedName ` 
    -Replace @{Description='EMPTY SITE LINK'+` 
    $(If ($_.Options -band 1) {' (Notify)'})}}

The real magic in these lines are the LDAP filters:

  • All sitelinks: ‘(objectClass=siteLink)’
  • Sitelinks with member sites: ‘(&(objectClass=siteLink)(siteList=*))’
  • Sitelinks without member sites: ‘(&(objectClass=siteLink)(!siteList=*))’

Once you have imported the ActiveDirectory module you can type Get-Help about_ActiveDirectory_filter for more information on creating LDAP filter syntax.

But wait… there’s more!

In the script file attached at the end of the post I have included all of the scripts above plus some bonus content.  There is a site report script that will give you some schweet stats on your AD sites.  Use it to find those sites that are not in a site link, missing subnets, or do not have a DC.  The output looks like this:

Name     SiteLinkCount SubnetCount DCCount IsEmpty WhenCreated  Description
----     ------------- ----------- ------- ------- -----------  -----------
Bogus1               1           0       0    True 10/6/2010    Test site
Bogus2               0           0       0    True 1/25/2011    Test site
Bogus3               0           0       0    True 1/25/2011    Test site
Kentucky             3           1       2   False 4/13/2010    Kentucky
Lonely               2           1       1   False 2/17/2011    Remote site
Ohio                 2           2       2   False 4/13/2010    Ohio

Armed with this handy little report you will know where to begin your site, subnet, and site link remediation activities.

The Fine Print

This version of the script works with PowerShell v2 in your environment today. In AD PowerShell v3 there are new cmdlets to work with site links directly.

If you’re one of those who likes to note WAN speeds on site link descriptions, then you have a couple options:

  • Don’t run the script. It will overwrite your notes in the descriptions.
  • Export the descriptions, run this script, then manually add back the WAN speeds.

Unless you schedule this script to run as a scheduled task, you’ll need to run it again any time you update sites or site links. The descriptions are only as good as the last run of the script.

Currently the script inserts ‘<–>’ between the site names. Feel free to edit this to your liking.

If you have 1,000,000,000 sites jammed into a single site link, then it is likely that the concatenated description string will be too long and break the script.  Don’t do that if you can avoid it.

Running this script is harmless to your environment’s functionality, but it will overwrite your existing site link descriptions. As always you should test it in a lab first.